Category Archives: architecture

Eden Project Cornwall,England: Beautiful Amalgamation of Art, Nature and Science

It’s not everyday that you get to visit a magical Global garden like the Eden Project in Cornwall, England (UK). So when I found myself finally standing on ‘Eden soil’ under one of the massive biomes that house the world’s largest rain-forest in captivity, along with other plant species from the Mediterranean,South Africa and California, I was nothing short of mesmerized. Never before had I witnessed a man made marvel nestled in a huge crater also with an outdoor garden spread over 30 acres. Recipient of the Best UK Leisure Attraction award continuously for 4 years (2014, 2013, 2012 and 2011) and the Silver Award for Best Leisure Attraction in 2016, the Eden Project is a must visit destination.  What makes the place even more interesting is the beautiful amalgamation of art, architecture, nature and science in one destination.

Eden Project, with view of biomes in backdrop
Eden Project, with view of biomes in backdrop

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Source: Eden Project Cornwall,England: Beautiful Amalgamation of Art, Nature and Science

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Travel:Overwhelmed by Old World Beauty in Bath,England.

If you are drawn towards Gothic ( English) revival architecture, head straight towards Bath in England (UK). Most of the medieval buildings here are built using honey coloured bath stone and carved and chiseled to perfection. The city of Bath is renowned for the Roman baths, Fashion museum and Jane Austin house among other attractions. No wonder its a UNESCO world heritage site and a major travel and tourist destination.

The perpendicular Gothic architecture of the Bath Abbey leaves one truly spellbound in wonder as one stares at the ornate and complex carvings painstakingly done on the walls of the church. The picture below shows the lively atmosphere outside the Bath Abbey. Interestingly, the chaos of the tourists adds value to the symmetrical lines of the beautiful monument. The joie de vivre of the people is palpable. As a matter of sheer coincidence, there is order again in the chaos with many of the tourists in the frame wearing turquoise blue and various other shades of blue. The bright pink flowers and the bicycle boards in the foreground give the necessary pop of colour to the picture, so that I fell in love with my own creation, err.. click almost instantly!

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Bath Abbey, City of Bath, England, UK

 

The cover picture shows the famed Roman baths which are a great example of Victorian style architecture. Again the human element makes the place look chaotic, yet even more beautiful as it makes the place alive; as is rightly said by Constantin Brancusi- “Architecture is inhabited sculpture”. Do you agree?

Awestruck at Natural history Museum,London

A permanent on the list of ’10 Best tourist attractions in London’ is The Natural History Museum, London. With its main entrance at Cromwell road, it is home to the tallest and biggest and rarest animals (or their replicas) in the world. When you reach the Blue Zone- Look up and see  blue whale model, seemingly swimming with the other cetacean skeletons and replicas suspended from the ceiling.

One may also gape in wonder at the sight of the slice of a giant Sequoia tree pitched on the wall. So, when one talks about big and huge, along with natural lines, be it in terms of the streamlined curves of the blue whale and other cetacean skeletons, mammoth elephants, or the shear beauty and architecture of the building itself housing all these treasures;one cannot think of a better place. Looking at the fine details engraved along arches and pillars on the entrance of the building is sure to leave one awestruck and speechless. But do you know the best part? There is no admission fee 🙂

This post is inspired by Day 7 (Big and Point of view) and Day 8 (Natural world and leading lines) of Photo101 Blogging U.

All pictures have been clicked by Anil Nanda and Ritu Nanda and may not be used without permission.

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Entrance to Natural History Museum, London
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Blue whale replica and other cetacean skeletons suspended from ceiling.

IMG_1297Blue whale replica and other cetacean skeletons suspended from ceiling.

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mammoth elephant

Eyeful

Obviously, you get no marks for recognizing the place in the cover picture of this post! But can you guess from where it was clicked? The sunlight bathes the Big Ben in beautiful shades of a pinkish hue , while the rest of the buildings seem swathed in shades of blue. The scene is quite an eyeful!

And what about the picture featured below? It’s a bird’s eye-view of the the beautiful landscaping of South Bank, London. Both these pictures were clicked from within the capsule of the London Eye, a major tourist attraction. Since they were clicked through the glass, it perhaps explains the very interesting play of light on the heritage buildings. I hope you enjoy viewing these pictures as much as we enjoyed clicking them 🙂

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Photo challenges are real fun! This post is inspired by the wordpress photo challenge Eye Spy by @Michelle W.

Pictures by: Anil Nanda and Ritu Nanda

Enticing Eiffel

What is it about this Puddling Iron grid structure that is so alluring? The 300m tall structure is iconic and makes it impossible to imagine Paris (or France) without it. Paris and Eiffel are now synonymous.

When you look at the Eiffel for the first time with your own eyes, after having seen its pictures in magazines, travel brochures and movies, you just can’t help being awestruck. A sigh escapes your being at the sheer marvel that it is. Actually, perhaps one is not really prepared for the grandiose, because the key-chain models and souvenir replicas that your relatives gifted you after their exciting Paris tour are poor replicas of the actual wonder.

The 7300 tons of iron make for an intriguing study in architecture and science. The Eiffel tower is the subject that inspires thousands of painters, artists and romantics throughout the world.

Eiffel up close
Eiffel up close

This June I was fortunate to visit Paris along with my husband. Just as we were about to leave after having our fill of the beautiful monument, my eye caught something that even tour guides fail to tell you. Just below the first balcony, I saw the names of famous physicists and mathematicians engraved on the sides of the tower. The physicist in me was mighty pleased to spot the names of Malus (Malus Law), Carnot (Carnot heat engine), Ampere (Ampere circuital law) and many more! In fact there are 72 names of French scientists, engineers, chemists and mathematicians engraved on the 4 sides with 18 names on each side of the tower. Gustave Eiffel got these names engraved in recognition of their contributions to society. The picture above was clicked by my dear husband; if you zoom the picture a bit , you could spot some of the names that feature on the North East side of the tower.

Into the Eiffel- Lift view
Into the Eiffel- Lift view

But what makes this gigantic structure so romantic?

Oh yes! If I may answer my own question- Its the beautiful landscaping around the tower, its visibility from various locations particularly the river Seine, the lights, and the sparkling lights at night, that lend an almost ethereal glow to the tower itself and the whole area around, transforming it magically. And the iron grid? Doesn’t the huge iron grid structure symbolize stability? Stable enough to last more than a century and still counting. Isn’t stability a trait that we all long for in lasting relationships? The promise makes Eiffel enticing!

All the photographs in this post are original clicks by the author and her husband, Anil Nanda.

History- Land of Confusion

I am a physicist and the reaction which I most often get from people I meet for the first time is that of awe. “How come you studied Physics? That is one subject I really used to fear while in school. It is so confusing!” is the general reaction. And seriously, I try to look like my humblest best and not like a cat who licked the cream, because such statements do make me feel important and intelligent. But let me tell you a secret. I too dreaded one subject when I was in school- History.

Physics was at least a logical study leading to some conclusion and attempted to unravel the mysterious laws of nature. History is also a subject based on facts and figures and perhaps some logical or illogical thinking of the rulers and kings of the past. The worst were our teachers who took our exams; expecting us to write whole essays covering the life and conquests of these kings, generation after generation! One of our teachers just looked at the length of the answer. The longer the write up , more the marks you get. No wonder some of the brave ones in our class wrote movie stories in between the answer, filling pages after pages. The first two paragraphs and the last paragraph were only relevant to the question, the middle part of the answer was a cleverly hidden movie story. Also don’t forget all those dates associated with various wars that had to be mugged up. Please historians, don’t take offence, but I was really very relieved when I passed out of school and joined college where I had to study History no longer.

Time has passed. Now I love and enjoy travelling. I enjoy visiting different places steeped in History. It gives so much character to the place and I wish to explore more. History seems so much like fun and not a burdensome job of learning endless lists of dates. My perception towards the subject has now changed. I salute all those great leaders, kings, spiritual leaders and soldiers who have greatly contributed in making all the beautiful palaces, forts, minars,museums, gardens and various world heritage sites throughout the world. Many of these are also part of the seven wonders of the world. History is no longer my land of confusion.

New7 Wonders of the world picture courtesy: wikipedia

Cover pic: courtesy of pixabay

Surreal Scotland

This week’s Photo challenge by The Daily Post,Converge, immediately brings to my mind our amazing road trip to Scotland.The medieval style of architecture in old town Edinburgh as well as Glasgow is at once both intriguing and intimidating. In the pictures featured in this post the convergence of building, human and nature elements is clearly visible.

The first picture is on the highway to Edinburgh, Scotland.

Beautiful convergence of road, undulating hills and the clouds
Beautiful convergence of road, undulating hills and the clouds
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Human, building and metal

In the picture below, there is the amazing convergence of textures and colours of the two walls which contrast beautifully with the bright circles of light on the sign board.

At the Royal Mile
At the Royal Mile
Glasgow
Glasgow